ABOUT GIST
—A rare cancer that affects your GI tract

 

are tumors that show up in the , often in the stomach or small intestine. About 4,000-6,000 adults in the US are diagnosed with GIST every year.

The cause of GIST is unknown. There are no known lifestyle factors that cause GIST (such as diet or smoking).

 

GIST can be treated in a few ways

GISTs that are in one area and haven't spread are often treated with surgery.

Advanced GIST is GIST that:

  • can no longer be treated with surgery or
  • has come back (recurrent) or
  • has spread (metastatic)

Common treatment options include:

  • Surgery
  • —A type of targeted medicine, including a treatment you may be currently taking.
  • Clinical Trials — Some people with GIST can join clinical trials that test new kinds of medicines

 
Target icon

Fighting advanced GIST with TKI medicines

The current best medicines for advanced GIST are TKIs. They find or target a kind of protein called a tyrosine kinase [TY-ruh-seen KY-nays]. Although TKIs are often used in advanced GIST, it's best to talk to your doctor about what treatment is right for you.

 
Mutation icon

About Mutations and Testing

GIST happens when certain genes in the body change.

GIST cells have genes that have changed in some way. These changes are called (mew‑tay‑shuns).

 

In people with GIST, the most common gene mutations are:

 
GIST Mutations Percentage Chart
 

Switch iconIn GIST, mutations can switch 'on' a kind of protein in the body called a tyrosine . A tyrosine kinase with a mutation is like a light switch that’s stuck in the ‘ON’ position. It sends signals that make cancer cells grow and spread uncontrollably.


Mutation testing for GIST

Sometimes, doctors can do a special test for certain gene mutations found in GIST.

The tests can show:

  • If you have or
  • The location of the mutation (exon)

Knowing your mutation type may help your doctors choose a treatment that works best for you.

Why treatments might stop working or someone might have to try a different treatment


Sometimes, genes can continue to change (mutate). This means that someone with GIST can have new and different mutations over time. If that happens, a treatment could stop working, even if it worked before. This is called drug resistance, and it could lead to progression.

Drug resistance means that:

  • Some people do not respond, or treatment stops working—even if it worked before
  • The dose of the current treatment may need to be increased
  • The person has to change to a new or different treatment

Progression means that:

  • Cancer cells may be growing
  • The tumor may be getting bigger and may be spreading

Sometimes certain side effects can make it difficult for someone to stay on a treatment. This is called treatment intolerance, and it may cause the person to have to try a new or different treatment.

Support for your journey


You and your care partners may sometimes feel alone on this journey. But, you’re not alone. Support is available. These resources have a lot of great information that can help you and your care partners through your GIST journey.

You'll have access to information about topics such as:

  • GIST and treatment options, including clinical trials
  • Questions to ask your doctor and nurses
  • Diet and nutrition
  • Connecting with other people with GIST

GIST support and information:

GISTTogether.com (A Deciphera-sponsored website)

GIST Support International

Life Raft Group

GIST Cancer Awareness Foundation

Deciphera is not affiliated with these organizations, does not endorse any particular service or group, and is not responsible for the content on their website or any services or materials they may provide.

Insurance help

Trying to understand your insurance can be a big challenge. Deciphera AccessPoint™ is here to help you make sense of it and find out what help is available.

VISIT DECIPHERA ACCESSPOINT

Explore more

Caution icon Side Effects

Learn about possible side effects with Qinlock.

More info
Heart lock icon How Qinlock Can Help

If it's time for a new treatment, learn how Qinlock can help to treat advanced GIST.

See how
Tablet icon Getting Started

You can take Qinlock with or without food.

Start here

Important Safety Information

Qinlock may cause serious side effects, including:

A skin problem called palmar‑plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome. Skin problems are common and sometimes can be severe. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop redness, pain, blisters, bleeding, or swelling on the palms of your hands or soles of your feet, or severe rash during treatment with Qinlock.

New skin cancers. Qinlock may cause skin cancers called cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma or melanoma. Talk to your healthcare provider about your risk for these cancers. Your healthcare provider should check your skin before and during treatment with Qinlock to look for any new skin cancers.

Check your skin and tell your healthcare provider right away about any skin changes, including a:

  • new wart
  • skin sore or reddish bump that bleeds or does not heal
  • change in size or color of a mole

High blood pressure (Hypertension). High blood pressure is common with Qinlock and can be severe. Your healthcare provider should check your blood pressure regularly during treatment with Qinlock.

Heart problems. Your healthcare provider should check you for signs or symptoms of heart failure before starting Qinlock and regularly during treatment with Qinlock. Heart failure can be serious and can sometimes lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any of the following symptoms during your treatment with Qinlock:

  • tiredness
  • shortness of breath
  • swelling of your stomach‑area (abdomen), legs or ankles
  • protruding neck veins

Risk of wound healing problems. Wounds may not heal well during treatment with Qinlock. Tell your healthcare provider if you plan to have any surgery before or during treatment with Qinlock. Your healthcare provider should tell you when to stop taking Qinlock before a planned surgery and when you may start taking Qinlock again after surgery.

The most common side effects of Qinlock include:

  • hair thinning or hair loss
  • tiredness
  • nausea
  • abdominal pain
  • constipation
  • muscle pain
  • diarrhea
  • decreased appetite
  • vomiting

These are not all the possible side effects of Qinlock.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1‑800‑FDA‑1088

It is not known if Qinlock is safe and effective in children.

Before taking Qinlock, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • had a type of skin problem called palmar‑plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome
  • have heart problems
  • have high blood pressure
  • had or plan to have surgery

For females, tell your healthcare provider if you:

  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Qinlock may harm your unborn baby.
  • can become pregnant as your healthcare provider will do a pregnancy test before you start treatment with Qinlock.
  • become pregnant or think you may be pregnant during treatment with Qinlock.
  • can become pregnant. Use effective birth control (contraception) during treatment with Qinlock and for at least 1 week after the final dose. Talk to your healthcare provider about birth control methods that may be right for you.
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if Qinlock passes into your breast milk. Do not breastfeed during treatment with Qinlock and for at least 1 week after your final dose.

For males with female partners who are able to become pregnant:

  • use effective birth control during treatment with Qinlock and for at least 1 week after the final dose.
  • if your female partner becomes pregnant during your treatment with Qinlock, tell your healthcare provider right away.

Qinlock may affect fertility in males which may affect the ability to have children. Talk to your healthcare provider if this is a concern for you.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over‑the‑counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Qinlock and certain other medicines can affect each other causing side effects or affect how Qinlock works.

Know the medicines you take. Keep a list of them to show to your healthcare provider and pharmacist when you get a new medicine.

General information about the safe and effective use of Qinlock.

Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Patient Information leaflet. Do not use Qinlock for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give Qinlock to other people, even if they have the same symptoms that you have. It may harm them. You can ask your pharmacist or healthcare provider for information about Qinlock that is written for health professionals.

Indication

What is Qinlock?

Qinlock is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) who have received 3 or more prior treatments for their GIST.

Please see complete Prescribing Information, including Patient Information.

Important Safety Information

Qinlock may cause serious side effects, including:

A skin problem called palmar‑plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome. Skin problems are common and sometimes can be severe. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop redness, pain, blisters, bleeding, or swelling on the palms of your hands or soles of your feet, or severe rash during treatment with Qinlock.

New skin cancers. Qinlock may cause skin cancers called cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma or melanoma. Talk to your healthcare provider about your risk for these cancers. Your healthcare provider should check your skin before and during treatment with Qinlock to look for any new skin cancers.

Check your skin and tell your healthcare provider right away about any skin changes, including a:

  • new wart
  • skin sore or reddish bump that bleeds or does not heal
  • change in size or color of a mole

High blood pressure (Hypertension). High blood pressure is common with Qinlock and can be severe. Your healthcare provider should check your blood pressure regularly during treatment with Qinlock.

Heart problems. Your healthcare provider should check you for signs or symptoms of heart failure before starting Qinlock and regularly during treatment with Qinlock. Heart failure can be serious and can sometimes lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any of the following symptoms during your treatment with Qinlock:

  • tiredness
  • shortness of breath
  • swelling of your stomach‑area (abdomen), legs or ankles
  • protruding neck veins

Risk of wound healing problems. Wounds may not heal well during treatment with Qinlock. Tell your healthcare provider if you plan to have any surgery before or during treatment with Qinlock. Your healthcare provider should tell you when to stop taking Qinlock before a planned surgery and when you may start taking Qinlock again after surgery.

The most common side effects of Qinlock include:

  • hair thinning or hair loss
  • tiredness
  • nausea
  • abdominal pain
  • constipation
  • muscle pain
  • diarrhea
  • decreased appetite
  • vomiting

These are not all the possible side effects of Qinlock.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1‑800‑FDA‑1088

It is not known if Qinlock is safe and effective in children.

Before taking Qinlock, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • had a type of skin problem called palmar‑plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome
  • have heart problems
  • have high blood pressure
  • had or plan to have surgery

For females, tell your healthcare provider if you:

  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Qinlock may harm your unborn baby.
  • can become pregnant as your healthcare provider will do a pregnancy test before you start treatment with Qinlock.
  • become pregnant or think you may be pregnant during treatment with Qinlock.
  • can become pregnant. Use effective birth control (contraception) during treatment with Qinlock and for at least 1 week after the final dose. Talk to your healthcare provider about birth control methods that may be right for you.
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if Qinlock passes into your breast milk. Do not breastfeed during treatment with Qinlock and for at least 1 week after your final dose.

For males with female partners who are able to become pregnant:

  • use effective birth control during treatment with Qinlock and for at least 1 week after the final dose.
  • if your female partner becomes pregnant during your treatment with Qinlock, tell your healthcare provider right away.

Qinlock may affect fertility in males which may affect the ability to have children. Talk to your healthcare provider if this is a concern for you.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over‑the‑counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Qinlock and certain other medicines can affect each other causing side effects or affect how Qinlock works.

Know the medicines you take. Keep a list of them to show to your healthcare provider and pharmacist when you get a new medicine.

General information about the safe and effective use of Qinlock.

Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Patient Information leaflet. Do not use Qinlock for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give Qinlock to other people, even if they have the same symptoms that you have. It may harm them. You can ask your pharmacist or healthcare provider for information about Qinlock that is written for health professionals.

Indication

What is Qinlock?

Qinlock is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) who have received 3 or more prior treatments for their GIST.

Please see complete Prescribing Information, including Patient Information.